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...

I love it how we get get

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an applause even before we've done anything.

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I think this is the power of positive thinking or or something.

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Something like that. Good

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evening and good afternoon.

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And welcome to the

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Global

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studio where

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we'll be taking

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regular

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deep dives and talking about

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some of the fundamental issues facing business today and

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examining those issues

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through the prisons of art

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creativity and education with a view too with luck

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offering some clues and business leaders as to.

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Who they need to be and

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what they need to know in order to indeed lead

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towards a more intentional

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in more intelligent future. My name is Ralph Tar, and

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today,

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it is my great pleasure

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to to welcome theo Admins

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to Bo.

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The is an artist

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research a great creative business

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entrepreneur.

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And

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as of a few days ago, officially, associate

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In

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wait for this, trans disciplinary research and innovation

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at the college of art and media.

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Of the University of Colorado. Welcome to.

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Hi, Ralph. How are you?

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Fantastic.

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Great. Great to have you here.

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Hey

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one way,

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one way you've

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defined your role in life.

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Is that

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of a cultural

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futurist?

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Is there a future without culture?

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Despite what some might have us believe,

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I think culture has always been at the core in the essence of everything that makes

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a distinctly human on this planet. So there is no future with that culture.

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A friend of mine

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diplomat

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culture manager.

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Right a record producer film producer

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permanently qualified to pass a judgment,

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says that business is a part of culture.

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Certainly not

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part from it.

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Business without culture will filter.

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Yes. I mean, you know, paul wall equipment is one of my favorite quotes that wall wrote

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among many as

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talks about pioneering into the wilderness of an open life.

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And, know from the first time I read that,

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I came kind of hooked and it it became my

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prism to, which I looked at everything.

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So when you think about the definition of culture and the creation of measurement of well being or you think about the innovation across

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diverse organizations and sectors

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business apologies.

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Cultures at the very core of everything we do. And this is where I find the opportunities for arts to translate science and to help business to see things differently,

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and to

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help business organize

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its understanding of culture in a way that aligns with its business mission

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to be a very powerful construct

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for right now as the world emerges Covid

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if you're in the Us as we are still very much in the midst of

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racial justice reckoning that this well overdue

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it's an exciting ...opportunity the time for artists to

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reclaim the role as as Shaman and then teachers and scientists.

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That is certainly

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quite

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a large load torn pattern will be we'll be doing Doing our live level best to to unpack at least some of that tonight. But seeing as you've have mentioned, the word

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measure

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prevailing management doctrine,

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says it can be managed if it can be measured,

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which, of course, means that that votes measured automatically gets managed.

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Whether or not it's actually measured

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correctly or even whether or not, It's the right thing to to be measuring in in in the first place.

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And

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it also means that if something can't be measured easily, it's relegated to the pile marked,

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important.

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Somehow. And that is just

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lazy blink

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thinking, but hey ...let's give them something to measure so they start to pay attention. Perhaps you have been measuring

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what has long been considered,

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soft, fluffy,

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and measurable stuff. And yet you have some hard numbers. Right?

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That's right. We

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have been working to the last three years so I originally began as a research project in a National Science foundation sponsored research center

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led to the creation of what we call the cultural well index.

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And the cultural well index is a construct

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of three primary

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signals,

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a hope, trust and belonging.

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So when we talk about hope what we're really measuring is an nation's personal agency question, that has to do with full setting and and pathways.

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Or we're measuring trust. It is a consonants question, confidence in systems.

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There's for ways that we can measure your trust depending upon what the moment or the task may be called for.

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And then if where we measure the belonging that I think comes into play in a very powerful way in the

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measurements that we take from an empirical standpoint point

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are we ...we're answering you're really measuring three primary questions.

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Are we safe, are we connected to do we share a future?

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And we've plot those out on hope is spotted on an x axis,

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and the trust is plotted on the y axis and the bottom piece are on the diagonal axis.

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And by plotting different types of

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diverse groups within an organization,

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their data on this access point, we're essentially able to heat map culture. And what I mean about heat map is you've probably seen some of the match that show air quality in a in a city works for it's supports fat or it's better it's round of ahead. Blank over the and it's show it's merely dark red across the kind of, you know, the the the outer suburbs.

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Exactly. So we can you don't make experience of different groups in and or that organization's culture is having on those groups. And it's at the intersection in

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those things who trusted and belonging

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that we're also able to come up with a secondary set of metrics

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that provide you incredibly rich data around measure measurements of creativity and curiosity and compassion.

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And, curiosity, it's a it's an innovation

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orientation

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creativity. It's not so much what predicts creativity, what creativity itself is predicting such as equity based mindset,

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And then the compassion that we're measuring is is not an empathy mindset measure. It's an action measure. So are you able to take perspective taking for

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someone that

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is not like you or has a different lived experience, and then you take action up on that in, you're working relationships and through. So these constructs

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we're able to really create a dialogue between the organization's tradition saying to aspirations,

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which ultimately allow for come an empirical data bridge for aligning an organization's culture change management with its innovation

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planning.

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What creativity

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predicts, I love that that

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phrase rather than trying to predict creativity Look at creativity and see

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what it can predict, what can it predict? What have you seen it predicting?

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There's a couple of areas that I trying to be incredibly fascinating.

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It the in the Us context and and most of my answers today, I'll be answering from Us context. Although, I do think it has applicability

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outside of the Us.

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So one of the things that I've assigned

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incredibly

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interesting and

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powerful

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is the evidence is starting to mount that creativity

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predicts equity based mindset. So here in the Us, you

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we're are having

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a centuries old

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problem really come to surface

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around diversity equity and inclusion in our society. You know, where you we're seeing the headlines in business.

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And so what the challenge there is is that

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most of the time,

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you have diversity equity and inclusion in a Us company.

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Has been or or an educational system or whatever. It's been relegated to an Hr function law, Hr

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human resources is a risk mitigation area of an organ,

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it's not tied to the growth strategies of innovation in most cases

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for organizations.

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And we all have

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the innovation

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areas of companies that are looking at ...how do you not ...how you create novel

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solutions in? So what's fascinating about creativity science,

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christianity side seems to point to

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some

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opportunities for growth and innovation in value creation from novel solution finding. So what I mean by that is

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you have

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we have you know we just look at the the way to technology economy has grown in the Us. We have

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invested trillions of dollars

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in

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a very specific

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viewpoint

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what Data says, so we know when says gender

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straight male

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white version of

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questions that are asked of different data sets

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are

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how what solutions they lead to? So therefore, the they they the solutions are designed

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with that as as an inherent in heaven bias. Right? Exactly. Exactly. You know, we're saying you. Look, you see it in, for example,

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just a clear example is if you look at autonomous cars, you know, we the algorithms

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that have been created there have a bias that often don't even read black skin is Well, I I I was ...I was totally fl against actually a couple of years ago., I'm sure you've seen this

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like, video clip of a black guy

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demonstrating

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how impossible it is for him to get sub out of a dispenser in the public by public bathroom,

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exactly. So, you know, that's just one really

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clear example. But I think it ...but I think the ...the much more insidious versions of that are the are the do nuances that that take place.

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But then if you think about, okay. So if you if you have a the same data set and you think about creativity as novel coming up with novel solutions.

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And we're are in an increasingly plural

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global economy with, you know, different

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lived experiences of different groups. And I may be an employee of at x, then a

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female employee is also part of the Lgbt community. You make it in as a person of color,

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All of those multi dimensional identity constructs

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inform how I make meaning of and the questions in the world and the questions I've that I'm my best of data that might be different put somebody with a different identity has.

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And so the way I'm looking at this is create the creativity science in the predictive nature of it.

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If you are engaged in a creative activity, stereotypes are not so useful for you,

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because it is about novelty. So if we get to the monopoly place at that virgin thinking. So let's just assume we have a data set.

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We know what the assistant or white street mail version

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of a Silicon Valley question

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that might be in search if a problem is that from that data set. Mhmm.

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Seen that a couple of times ago. See that a couple of times. Okay But one about all of these other amazing questions that are being asked by people but with a different lived experience of that same data

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that show and point to value creation

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from their world of view. I find that to be incredibly

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exciting to think about all of the new opportunities for growth that might present for a company. So you said these are simply markets that I'm not being addressed correct be Right? And it's still way the world is growing. So even if you are a leader who maybe perhaps doesn't fully buy you into social justice being important for your organization.

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I'm

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saying that our data is really pointing to, and the if you take the creativity science and the culture will be in data. It's twenty two that there are market opportunities being missed.

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And what important to also understand about this

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is that

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people are very sophisticated to today especially if you're looking at for example, Jim z who had, you know, as digital natives have had access to ideas from all around the world from the very time they they were born.

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And so when you're thinking about

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being able to manage

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or, your way into

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kind of a thing about some of the Species at the Un or or any of those, you know, plays that are looking at this idea of inclusion and equity.

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You can't really do there maybe more. The the marketplace is too sophisticated, And I think

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some corporations don't fully grasp that yet, and they're still looking at the idea of diversity as a p way, but you're really missing the whole point of inclusion, and that is to optimize

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resources

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and create new value and growth in the marketplace

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Yeah. The show be the the

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Because that's looking at it. That should be the marketing desk.

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It should be all of you should be all the deaths in in doing in coordination together, But has that worked with Ceo

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and companies across different sectors of all seriousness in the Us. The one thing that found is that folks who are looking at Usr

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and the folks who are looking at

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the

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diversity equity police strategies.

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Often, they don't even know who the innovation folks are in the same organization. Yeah. And so you have this disconnect that is ...that

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is a cultural management problem. So innovation,

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love dumb

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the person who's a charge of no

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experiments and Northern technology. Yep. He's a, you know, he's

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or space engineer,

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and he often breaks about It talks about how culture change management and

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in innovation this instance have roughly, you know, around the same failure rate we're around seventy percent.

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And, you know, in his

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some recent

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writings of i've seen by him. You know, he ...he's proper that there's a reason that those are around the same percentage is because they're the same thing, but we're not thinking of them as the same thing.

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And so let's say, when you think about from the signs of creativity?

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We have for the last fifty years, we've mostly been looking at what predicts creativity. And so when I say what creativity

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predicts, it predicts opportunities for turning

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novelty get value creation

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across a lot of different market segments, and even market segments that haven't even been conceived Devin born yet for one foot one equals three because no what person in today's world is just

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one identity,

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you know, in in the states, you know, we carry multi

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identity constructs every day. All of those may ask a different question of the same data,

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and that's an innovation play.

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What have been some of the

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the recent success stories that you have seen when where

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companies add organizations because I mean,, you know, we are talking also about

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in a public administration, for instance, but

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where organizations have

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have plugged in this kind of thinking

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and

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have

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drawn the equal sign between

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innovation and culture.

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Have you seen

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any any

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successes?

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I think there's some signals

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on the horizon that are project based.

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I I I can't say that I as can think of getting one organization is fully embraced because most of them are still think about are still thinking of just even

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the old old school and I'm doing air quotes,

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Innovation

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model has being a project based model that lives in a place within an organization that fully throughout an organization that everyone sees themselves as part of that innovation play that who may be

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throughout from the staff to

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different organizational departments.

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And so

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when I think about when I think about who's giving right, I think there's, you know, different organizations that young pieces of it so when we think about creative experiments,

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and I'm calling creative experiments and innovation

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initiatives, very ...I'm equated to each other here. There's really three types of creative experiments. There's the the competent

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creativity, which produces an unfamiliar combination

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of ideas

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and there's exploratory creativity

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and that's based on some kind of well space of thinking and the spaces is or looking both for previously

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unused places

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as well as new places to understand potential limits.

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And then this transformational upgrades where this space to process, all of it is transformed by altering some of dimensions. And so those ideas that are generated could not be generated before the transformation.

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So when I talk was talking about the media play, it's that transformational creativity

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and the opportunity that ain't truly inclusive

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organization

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managed to have that I think is is exciting.

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Well, whether you're talking about combinator

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explored her transformational creativity,

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there is an element of an environment

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that is at play within all of those. That's why you can't just live in one place of an organization essay. That's why I think

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that this idea of cultural change management innovation

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are different signs of exactly the same coin so what we thinking in about the environments of creativity,

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I'm starting to increasingly look at why are do those environments look like? And I could ...the wasn't tell you is it's not pink plant and being that.

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No.

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As matches as much as, you know, and

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some ...well, well,

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meaning, but

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misguided Hr

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managers would have us believe

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Exactly. So, you know, environment is

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is based not in the environment in terms of fiscal space, although, I think physical spice

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has its role, but I think it's in the relationships

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people within an organization are on a team.

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And that the organizations that are starting to get that equation right

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for your whether you're talking about

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opportunities for you know, Amy Admins

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at Harvard talks about psychological safety. I think that's part of creativity.

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They because for career creativity

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to flourish. You've gotta have an open change exchange of ideas, and people don't feel safe in their environment or they don't feel connected.

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Or they don't feel like they share a future. You're not gonna really have the opportunity. You don't have the type of environment that's really gonna be able to

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bleed into all that creativity has to offer as an innovation.

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So we the ...how front what you think that environment then you gotta think about skills. You nothing think about resources and you gotta thing about motivation.

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So the skills and innovation management, I think there's some organizations that are beginning to really understand how to invest in those we're seeing

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like Lucerne and Switzerland. And again, going back to No bell labs, I think as a meriwether whether

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breed artist in as part of the skills, skilled innovation management,

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level up for their employees, but not just to bring the artists to do our, but bring in artist to do really interesting things as part of their innovation teams,

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where there's this this kind of feedback loop where the art

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Yeah. It genders me thinking the new thinking feeds that is the artistic process, and it's not a one off. It's not just of one and done. It's an ongoing system.

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I was just reading that it's serving the other day. They've had a fascinating program going for

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quite a few years,

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and they have a a couple of

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artists that believe they're from the Us that are doing some some work in black quantum feature a not how not to fascinating.

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So it's it's great that the artists are getting that opportunity, but the skill set

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that Discern is also cultivating with and Some people by doing that is is also

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phenomenal to think about. So these guys doing black future,

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make sure we know we've scene.

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We can appreciate, but this is

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at that quantum physics level.

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Yes.

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Okay.

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And it's in it, but it's it's beginning through the lens of beginning to the lens of asking

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these new questions. Is that transformation creativity I talked about or the space, the process and everything else is being transformed.

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Because its dimensions have been altered.

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And it's the artists that are all beginning to offer the dimensions of the questions that are being asking this in this. And we'll, you know, we'll see where it goes. But I think we ...if you look at throughout history,

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this these are roles that artists have always played. You know, I I ...there's just two folks that I find just incredibly

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important to my own to my own word. One is to shop And

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the the other one is joseph voice.

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And, you know, the idea of of sha being able to

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in one cell move,

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be able to

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disrupt an entire fine artist establishments.

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And at the same time, often an entire industrial manufacturing sector, by taking a the lowly porcelain of toilet. It got printed into an intervention.

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Nothing was the same after that. It it kind of changed to everything.

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In that one move, and I think it doesn't take a huge

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motion.

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To gender huge change.

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It takes a huge idea sparked in the right place at the right time

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in a way that challenges

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questions

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that makes

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that once you once those check check questions have been once though

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a mind

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mental model of the world has been challenged

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in the new way like they shocked it, for example.

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All of a sudden, we stopped asking what and how

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and we started to ask why

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or perhaps more importantly, why not?

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Indeed, and that's the third as you're gig kind of signaling to the third element of creating environments, and that is the motivation.

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And so

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one person's motivation

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create to be created

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to be creative and the questions of that that person she asked if her creative environment

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are gonna be different than another person.

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And I don't think there should be hierarchy. I think we need to, like,

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for creativity flourish, people have to flourish.

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And for and so there's a

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relationship

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between in their research between wealthy

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and creativity.

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And I think that's a fascinating thing for us to mine. And there's no reason that it should be validated

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to our therapy music therapy to health in medicine.

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It should also be we should think about the the relationship of that in terms of works out well i mean, you think about gallop reports that about one in three of us are doing

...

showing up fully engaged at work, which means that on any given day, if you believe a gal does not do because I I I think it's really well done. It's not just gallop, and it's not just in the states Yeah. It means that two outs three others us are showing up to collect a paycheck and go home. Well well that's an innovation.

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Challenge.

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That is fundamentally

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cultural.

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And the systems that god us here are not gonna be the same systems that help us get out of here. So we have to move into that transformation of creativity for you have

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the the shops of the world who are

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you know,

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lesbian latinos

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and

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black folks from opal. And all of, you know, these different lived experiences

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provide this incredible cognitive flexibility

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of understanding the wrong military cause a situational awareness in some ways that two trusted military. They

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had to figure out if you're running a global operation,

...

how you move in in an out of cultures, and I'm certainly not lifting up the military

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the best chocolates

...

positively here, But I'm just saying that they they have really intentionally thought about this in ways that at the creative sector hasn't even thought about it. Well, on the on of on another a particularly basic

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level if you have a blind blind

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and you don't know that you have a blind spot,

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then you are not going to do particularly well in that

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particular piece of piece of

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you know, operational theater conflict as they say. And all of us have blind spot it's only through servicing nodes in a way that we're able to harness the wisdom of the group.

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Exactly. But sorry. Yeah. Yeah. Where are my blind spots?

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Why why do I have them is even secondary?

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But, you know, where are they and how can I possibly build in some rare view mirrors to be able to actually see around corners?

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And, of course, artists, you know, artists do that all day every day.

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But the idea of getting artists right into the

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college living corporate tissue of companies

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and organizations terri most managers.

...

But then it's not exactly new.

...

Nor is it unproven? Is it? I mean, there have been many experiments that have worked

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in the Indeed.

...

You know, I've even been involved in some that that signal promised I think the the ones that work have a couple of

...

of things that or maybe even three that are going form that evidence if I didn't identify it that that I would look for.

...

One is

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is the creativity

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being thought about and if you company x

...

is it being thought about as a thing that you acquire

...

or

...

are the leaders thinking about thinking about it as a dialogue

...

between systems?

...

If it's being thought about as a thing, you acquire just a personal expression,

...

that's not a company that that is gonna be making that next job.

...

But the ones who

...

thinking about creativity as this dialogue between their systems that may involve personally expressive,

...

but then how why does that personal express form of creativity?

...

What can you learn from that?

...

In the question you're asking at the intersection between systems. That's where gets really interesting. So it's a dialogue.

...

The second thing method think is really important that I look for is curiosity.

...

In popular culture creativity curiosity, are we had thrown around quite a bit these days, but i I got question most of the time if the curiosity

...

this being talked about is really curiosity or it's just ...an obligation and a leader feels like they have to to say,

...

because curiosity is also a dialogue. It's dialogue tweak motivations and emotions in cognition.

...

And so that curiosity can happen at the person it can also happen that an organization level. Right and it's also also in part

...

anxiety management.

...

On a personal level.

...

Indeed is indeed. It is because in we

...

you actually just ...where we measure your curiosity

...

in in our work.

...

That's one of the faces of curiosity that we're empirical. Putting in a number two is like, what is your orientation?

...

To to

...

stress management. And in and and do you wanna leave that? Or you a verse to that?

...

The other dialogue

...

that is really important to this that I look forward to for to see organizations are getting it right is when they talk about innovation,

...

what kind of innovation are they talking about?

...

Because I think you have not have talked about this before this the ...kind when you think about well being.

...

That is a motivator in innovation. And so well, be talked that the relationship is creativity well be. So there's there's three different kinds of well.

...

One type of well is a valuable. That's just like,, you know, from where I am today, I'm I'm doing alright. I've got some purpose in my life. That kinda thing. That's fine. But that's a moment of times this snapshot.

...

Not really an innovation point. The second type of well is called.

...

My heroism.

...

Is characterized as the seeking a pleasure or the avoidance of pain,

...

Dot is that first light that you get on Facebook. And from a well being standpoint,

...

that first like is more important to you, than a million that will after it. Because there's thing called a Sonic adaptation that that comes into play the the defective. It goes away for. But you good ...you're get used to

...

to a particular level of heroism.

...

Yeah. You this this this, you know, this Tv or or a computer, whatever it is, that the the markets tell you, you gotta have this to be cool so you get it it's great. And then ...you know,

...

fix next year. You have to go go out and get the sixty five inch model because it's just ...the what ...the the forty five inch model is just simply not not not good enough. That's it. And so what what's happening with that is

...

you're getting this little chemical releasing in your brain that's making you feel really good. So that's that pleasure or avoiding pain.

...

Well, the funny thing about it is

...

in the ...is that we have that after, the more that you engage in, the more that had

...

activity.

...

We know scientifically that you become less creative

...

and you become less curious of the world. The two three things need for innovation.

...

Right. And so we have built an the entire innovation ecosystem

...

around these madonna concepts, And now we're taking each thing about website well being. We've got all these kind of individual behavior change modification If we if ...you know, if if my workforce is not experiencing, well being well, it's there motivation that's problem. They're not behaving. Right? It's the individual.

...

You know, very rarely good people think about in terms of the environment and that just ...it's been funny you're open up watch

...

these things around, like, website, well firms that we ...that

...

there's very little research to support that they work on any level.

...

Which ...now we're just apply in technology to it. And we're gonna ...we're gonna scale what doesn't work bigger so it could not work

...

that scale Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. We we lose ...we we we lose ten cents on every transaction, but we may make it up in volume. Yeah.

...

That's exactly right. Well, there's another type of well being

...

that's called You mnemonic will be

...

it is his character online the Sonic, which is a ci to plays importance of pain

...

mnemonic well being characterized

...

about the speaking of me,

...

and that it it ...the this components of it that has to do with skill acquisition, learning new things. And I ...sample

...

eleven, this when you look when you bake bread,

...

a very conceptual. People tell they're like, well,, how can do sharper conceptually? You know, as perception what does he know about innovation Right?

...

Well, I think it has something to do with the seeking of meaning and this changing the parameters because when you baked bread,

...

that's a very conceptual thing that you're engaged in.

...

You have a few pieces of of words scribble on maybe a card, a recipe card or or something

...

and you you start to conceive of a notion in your head about what it's gonna look like what it's gonna smell like. And so you begin to engage in math and for science and combination of dry and wet ingredients, and you're turning onto a heat source to to put the bread into to debate

...

So all of those types of things together

...

are you demonic concepts that you're bringing together, then to seek in that is engaged in the seeking meeting. So what's interesting about that mnemonic well being concept

...

is we also know that the more that you engage in.

...

You become

...

more creative,

...

more curious

...

about the world.

...

And

...

we also know that that mnemonic well be is heavily mediated

...

by your cultural identity. So so we're out bread recipe

...

becomes your favorite grandmother's

...

bread recipe that you remember her making as a child

...

when you were you know, at apron strings,

...

the positive benefits of that,

...

get extended and deepened

...

far far beyond quite any of the Madonna Facebook likes or acquisition of things.

...

It doesn't ...it doesn't just taste better.

...

It doesn't just taste better.

...

And so when you think about innovation and creativity,

...

artists are engaging in these dialogues around curiosity,

...

motivations emotions come they're engaging and dialogues

...

between systems from personal expressive to, you know, paradigm shifting, and they're engaging in these dialogue

...

between meeting making and the seeking of pleasure avoidance pain as part of their day to day activities.

...

And so if we can figure out

...

how to

...

physically

...

create opportunities

...

for artists

...

to be engaged as innovation agents

...

on teams in different sectors,

...

it points to the potential that we are going to hit that magic spot eventually for an organization

...

with these dialogues that they have

...

introduced into their systems.

...

Begin to help them create feedback loops that align their culture change management

...

with their innovation initiatives. It's such a powerful way that the marketing the almost becomes the actor

...

because of the way they constructed the value.

...

Let's

...

just take our

...

quick breather.

...

And

...

in a moment will, that we'll open up.

...

Open out the microphone for for questions and comments and and what have you

...

I'll drag some random humans up and stage need.

...

See if they wish to throw

...

anything into the pot

...

In the meantime,

...

just a quick reminder, my name is

...

Ralph Tam. This is the

...

Global studio.

...

And today, I'm talking to Admins.

...

You can find us on bohr global

...

where you will find out. All about what it is we do

...

and how it is we think.

...

And today, we are talking about the role of

...

so so the potential

...

and

...

sadly much

...

much under

...

underutilized role

...

that artists can play within organizations large and small

...

beyond

...

the supply of beautiful objects.

...

And

...

writing of beautiful

...

theme songs.

...

Let's see anyone wishes to

...

come up, please

...

raise a flag raise your hand,

...

but do not feel under any obligation to do so.

...

And in fact, better that that you done because I have plenty of questions for the myself.

...

That's a joke, by the way.

...

So so

...

coming back to this

...

idea that artists have value

...

at a strategic level, not merely at a and

...

static or even operational level.

...

Or, and and an operation level.

...

I find that

...

disappointing

...

that while business is very fond

...

of celebrating the achievements of star artists.

...

It is actually terrified

...

of adopting some of the very ideas and approaches.

...

Those artists had used in order to become stars.

...

So there's being a positive sla

...

program.

...

The question is

...

what can we do to help business

...

leaders become more accustomed to accepting new ways of looking at existing problems?

...

Where do we start? Where do we put in the

...

put in the the the first hook?

...

One of the things that we're working on

...

it is decided you do just that it's related to the future of work for the past two or three years since I've been doing the measurements

...

around the

...

hope tres logging creativity curiosity, a passion as set of predictive analytics.

...

One of the things that I have been fascinated to see is how

...

some of the top skills in future of work,

...

all circle around some of these same concepts around cognitive flexibility,

...

around

...

curiosity

...

compassion.

...

I may not be using those exact words. Creativity certainly is always up there. Well these are all components of creativity.

...

They are health components of creativity. Absolutely. They are.

...

And so what we began to do is to develop a project

...

just like that bread recipe. Sometimes you have to be able to taste it and touch it before you fully appreciate and understand what it is.

...

So we've developed a a project here that's in nation stages in the Us

...

in six American cities.

...

Brooklyn, Austin,

...

Louisville Kentucky, Atlanta, Georgia, New Orleans and Jennifer Colorado.

...

That is going to be putting some of these ideas I've been talking about at play. It's called the

...

initiative. And so the unchecked simply needs the human side of the future of work.

...

And we are co creating and innovation discovery experiments with host companies

...

that can help human as the future of work and these artists creators are gonna be paired

...

with

...

health to time health companies tiny your coke, appropriate pathways,

...

or cultural while being creativity to new organizations.

...

Three the kind the context we're working with around that is a a three part context.

...

First part is that we recognize the corporate innovation strategies right now are more technically oriented and not culturally responsive.

...

And so these current business structures

...

kids work innovation and growth by demanding obedience to efficiency without the appropriate culture context. And certainly you know, I think, over the last year, we've seen this because Poet has fundamentally

...

exposed

...

these these

...

hairline fractures in their society and made them very obvious.

...

And so if you think about how do we ship the ties from shareholders of the stakeholder capitalism

...

and evolve that corporate social response possibility.

...

It's going to require to think about things in a cultural way that goes beyond these technical

...

solutions.

...

So that's pull one seven pillar we're reminding it contextual is how the the concepts of creativity

...

currently in business are actually

...

limiting.

...

Economic growth. So for business

...

to be a stable resilient pathway forward, is gonna require the recognition

...

of what it means facts will create value society. So this is not spec creating direct disruption because the beauty of creativity

...

isn't that it's not just a disrupt. Creativity is about

...

developing meaning in the world.

...

And so not just how many ideas can you come up with, but how do you come up with novel how you creation, not just novel is, the turn that novelty into value

...

across

...

a whole lot of different

...

seven and more. So so we've had five hundred years of capitalism.

...

Some things have worked,

...

well, others have worked really not well at all.

...

So we are now redesigning capitalism

...

itself.

...

Yeah. Whether you're a diverse employee group or

...

a supplier or a customer,

...

they're looking for that same meaning in their relationship with you as your employees, you know, as your employees are. So that that

...

stakeholder creation has to acknowledge that stakeholders

...

are gonna determine that for themselves in some ways. And so you've gotta have an understanding of that.

...

And then the, you know, third pillars that have idea around that are discussed around workforce well being, and it's getting worse, and that as an innovation challenge for sure.

...

And so within those context of

...

cultural responsibility

...

and stakeholder

...

capitalism

...

and workforce well being, how you take those

...

three pillars

...

and begin working with them.

...

Well, big question that we ask in him,

...

Laura Stein who's

...

well the founding ...the founder of Bo she she and I have had conversations for last year, so.

...

And

...

one of the ...she said to me one day she said, fuck happened to that project you did back in twenty fourteen, and she was referring to project That did.

...

That was fun about the national Endowment for the arts here in the Us, where we

...

placed artist inside of companies life general electric and Humanity, which is a

...

one of the top five largest insurance corp health insurance corporations in the country to do innovation projects, and it was fascinating.

...

It was a it was maybe a little

...

before

...

we really knew what to do with it after just in the project. So we've revisited that idea and now we're bringing it forward these cultural analytics I've been talking about. And we're gonna be training artist creators to help companies to prepare for the future work by their culture change management,

...

and their innovation and this this

...

in in the same in in align with each other as a as a value had pillar of innovation in those companies.

...

And the objective that we have is to apply the science of creativity and culture to help

...

what we call we say we're gonna help companies live the very best story that their people can tell.

...

And that comes from

...

Rob, who is an artist also with Met through Boba folks.

...

That's a a that he gave us in one of his bones speeches paris

...

right before Covid hit and that just hit me like a ton of bricks and it was really that idea about, can you live the best story? You can tell that's why brought it all together for me, a very power away because her, if you look at glass store, you're looking in the sentiment analysis that people are doing when they're leaking companies,

...

they're already telling

...

in future workers are already telling each other

...

why it's like to work at that company. So companies have really got under saying this not as just an Hr management

...

problem.

...

If the if if

...

employees are leaving and and not speaking well, the company that's an and that's holding back their innovation.

...

And so how do you lean into that?

...

We've identified that there's

...

three value ads that we think we kid that artists are particularly

...

suited for

...

in this work. So one is employee well a belonging

...

given in future work, and then there's inclusive innovation in social interaction.

...

And so with this, we have

...

a we're taking a portfolio approach to this project in the cities.

...

Some side partners in in the cities are entrepreneurs and himself, for example, In at Atlanta Georgia,

...

Chavez,

...

her company

...

living book

...

combines

...

the concepts of of medicine

...

and food and identity

...

with cultural with Ai to produce a product that allows people who get a diagnosis, for example, diabetes be

...

to personalize

...

their food

...

to their identity. So right now, if you are, you know,

...

the the Latin,

...

ex community in his bank community here in the Us very high rates of diabetes.

...

But if you a relationship

...

with food is a very personal thing. So if the only option you have after you get a diagnosis of diabetes business and changing

...

your food is to change it to something that so far away from your cultural identity, you're probably not gonna do it, it's gonna impact your health. So Sean is gonna you're gonna hate it if you do, which handy you gonna make miserable. Yeah, Of course. And so you think ......so you think about you, you know, obesity, or any any of these challenges that revolve around food and identity and the ability Then we now have with Ai

...

to lean into and and understand this in in a way that is

...

able to scale very quickly as exciting so sean

...

is our lead site in Atlanta, and she's working with

...

Google and Warhol University, school Medicine, or ...which is a store black college in

...

in atlanta.

...

And then in Denver,

...

we have

...

some really exciting things

...

evolving around companies who are in the health space.

...

Who have had

...

during Covid that had people coming into work and had for patient duties, and then their they're marketing their research all of those functions of companies had been removed for the last year.

...

And so they've not come into the facility at all. And so now you have Covid be ending, and you have Ceo being challenged.

...

Slash murdered trying to merge two companies

...

together

...

into one again to advance forward.

...

And so we think that artists can be

...

particularly useful and in and helping to understand how instill innovation mindset says you have to deal with

...

that merging to a remote workforce and the workforce it's been high touch in Covid Back together, And, of course, there's implications beyond Covid. I mean, like i ...you know, you think about any two industries that are emerging are the way that

...

even two companies might try to merge their cultures together when they're once requires the other. There's application of these ideas beyond just the context there. And then in

...

last example, I'll give you. ...In his early days to be sure on this. But

...

so since immersion here, there's a large business accelerator

...

and

...

the Ceo of the accelerator who's ...it's a funded about the national institutes of health. It's very large prestigious health care business accelerator.

...

The

...

leader of the Ceo of the company, she said, you know, we've got

...

interestingly,

...

these companies she calls some zombie companies.

...

And she said, you know, our paper. The the walking wounded, the undead

...

the undead.

...

She said on paper, they have all the elements.

...

The right ...look black the right team, look like the right idea. Look like the right time and for whatever reason, it just

...

didn't work.

...

And so what the idea is how can we find,

...

you know, some very sophisticated artist and have them take a second look through a culturally responsive lens?

...

And the companies still have somewhere runway where left this. They they still have some fun in the

...

in the bank.

...

Some some Mason may not. But that even the ones that don't massive and massive investments have been made in something did work. And and I did work. I mean, they didn't, you know, grow or wasn't acquired or different goals there. But..

...

But how can artists who asked these

...

different questions, create these new dialogues,

...

to surface

...

new utility new value creation new markets. And maybe it was a the right idea raw market.

...

Artists are really good at that, You know, I myself am an installation artist.

...

And so I am at my happiest when I'm just

...

I wonder through the woods and pick up a tree branch or I'm may go to

...

find an interesting part in the junkyard

...

or and then bring it all together into an installation project.

...

It changes the environment and has all of the pieces work together tell a story. Well, that's exactly the same thing I do as I have done as a corporate strategist

...

in in my passwords. And so

...

we tend to think about these things that artists are doing, these things that business people are doing as fundamentally different things. But there are of course, skill sets that are just being expressed in different way. So it's in some ways,

...

it's not really about

...

introducing radically different ways of working.

...

It's introducing radically different ways of value creation and having been putting in those in dialogue with each other because that after core in some ways, fuel sets are very, very similar to.

...

Well what you've just described,

...

asked that

...

little little brief

...

glimpse into the creative process.

...

Or urge you've just described is inherently messy,

...

The invention

...

process.

...

Is messy. The creation process

...

is messy plus know, for the longest time, it may seem like there isn't a whole lot going on.

...

And while

...

this dismissing may be one of the more delightful

...

aspects of invention,

...

and, you know, artists

...

relating

...

inherently to

...

not knowing how things will turn out because this is this is what the whole purpose of

...

creating your art is

...

just to go see,

...

in today's world,

...

we really have no idea how things are going to turn out.

...

So the ability to not just deal with that

...

methodist and uncertainty, but

...

embrace them.

...

And to use them as propellant.

...

This is going to be

...

governing factor of success yet. Most managers in most companies

...

react

...

to uncertainty, understandably

...

with pushing for more certainty

...

and, of course, that is

...

immediately

...

from the outset doomed

...

effort.

...

So are we going to see many companies go to the wall for that very reason that they hang on

...

to what you you're used to work and just refuse to let go and realize

...

uncertainty

...

is really the new normal and we better Or get used to it.

...

Just certainly a quite possible

...

notion that I think all of us

...

would agree with at some level of the year we villagers come through for sure. And, you know, the the the work here that we're discussing it's not about turning business people into artist.

...

Or our artist into business people.

...

It's recognizing

...

that in a very complex world.

...

Or creativity is a primary driver of value creation in innovation and discovery.

...

The creativity is gonna a degree of freedom for that value to be realized and so that freedom

...

can be recognized

...

by trying to put it all inside of an organization.

...

Where it's probably gonna be done.

...

Okay. You're not well at all. You know, like a lot of the in in intra or entrepreneurship,

...

that experiments that we've we've seen have not

...

necessarily worked out. So what because there's a same group of people just in a project space with green bags and and first tables. Yeah. So what I'm ...what I'm saying is

...

let's put different

...

systems and thinkers

...

in a different dialogue with each other and not think of it as one offs

...

or not think of it as a hierarchical model. To think of it as an ecosystem for

...

that is creating possibilities

...

of more possibilities.

...

Right now don't know we don't know what those possibilities may even look like. And it's gonna be very, very hard

...

for

...

both sides

...

because you have if you're a business leader,

...

especially the expression publicly Traded companies,

...

you're business later,

...

you you're looking at those quarterly earnings calls and, like, how far are you actually gonna go out,

...

when you have a notion that efficiency

...

of your

...

workflow is gonna be put at risk by introducing something new into it, even though even though you know that if you don't, you're also in trouble.

...

It can't be paralyzing.

...

And if you're a

...

artist in the Us, artists have for so long been made to negative up, a philanthropic sector.

...

So, you know, it's there the recipients of the largest and the and the goodwill of of pregnant net individuals and governments and core corporations.

...

That's that's all ...that's all well and good, but it also has created

...

a

...

a very strong divide that looks at for most artists are looking at

...

companies and corporate players, you know, as kind of kinda the villain in the James Bond movie.

...

And the corporations are looking at artists

...

thanks to the probably the romantic,

...

and you know as just

...

just shy of

...

of crazy

...

interesting

...

fascinating,

...

but not took quite with on the occasion, but connie ...but not really in germ to what I'm doing in my day to day a business leader.

...

And I think that that is just incredibly short sighted.

...

And why is wonderful

...

about

...

is that artists are beginning to figure out

...

how to do this without being invited by companies asking them to do it. And and it's, you know, it's gonna be ...it's gonna be fascinating to see what happens

...

over the next several years you know we're talking about nifty the other day.

...

And the potential for

...

for technology to liberate

...

artist

...

for their own self funding and business models in

...

for them to engage in kind of

...

shifting mental models of the systems that they feel

...

are not working for them.

...

And we'll, you know, what we'll see where it goes that ...we all know the Codec,

...

the Codex story when codec, you know, turned down the

...

development of a distal camera and and then

...

we skip five

...

decade later from maybe a little bit or from when that happened.

...

And here is this company that had billions and billions of dollars of market value and hundreds of thousand employees worldwide,

...

then you go to

...

a couple decades later, you know, there's social selfie.

...

Yeah.

...

Codec is bankrupt in Instagram.

...

Has a billion dollar mark capitalization with about seven.

...

This

...

this conversation

...

comes up again and again, and

...

in, you know,

...

circles of

...

artists and business people,

...

and the wall against which

...

it seems to just

...

continue to break

...

is one of an unwillingness

...

to redefine

...

the notion of partnership

...

broadly perhaps

...

relationship

...

with the focus on partnership

...

because

...

as you were saying, the relationship of an artist and

...

let's say a company

...

or an individual has traditionally been been one of

...

a patron

...

and a performer of

...

of particular creative task.

...

And

...

what what we seem to be getting

...

getting to in this conversation

...

is that if we

...

were to successfully

...

broaden

...

that definition of relationship.

...

To include

...

strands of a partnership where

...

there is a level of interest

...

beyond simply taking a sneak peek into the artist studio and saying, oh, wow. That's really cool. I have no idea what you do here, but it's really cool. Now I I'm I'm I'm off to look. Look at my look my look at my excel, you know, spreadsheet.

...

If we actually both sides stopped for a second,

...

and considered, well, maybe there is a conversation to be head about the process.

...

And then

...

the value of that process, the the real

...

strategic value

...

of that process and the thinking behind that process

...

may become apparent.

...

And I think that's kind of in part why

...

the your your antics

...

project,

...

may in fact, hot you

...

cut on your path through this

...

ticket. Do you think?

...

Yeah. I I think if part of it is that dialogue that you're talking about And I think, you know, I I asked i I'm thinking

...

every single day about what can business innovation processes learned from the artist studio,

...

you know,? Because that's a the artist studios are liberating

...

psychologically and physically safe space for artists that allows for this play and cognitive flexibility and compassionate action.

...

To become the tools for manifesting concepts and ideas into reality.

...

That sounds an awful lot like what most cheap innovation off are trying to think about how to get out of

...

the people that they hire.

...

And what's really fascinating

...

about about this is

...

it's not ...we're

...

living in the kelly's. You put it out earlier. We're living in a very

...

complex world that is can be fear.

...

Fearful, but it can also be incredibly exciting if we feel like we

...

don't have all the answers, but we have the partners

...

who can help us

...

walk with them and we will and they walk with us and asking in in in finding out

...

new ways of thinking about the world because the world is. The one thing about culture culture has always changing. It is not static.

...

And so you when if you ...if you are devoid of relationships as a business that can provide you that I'm ongoing feedback in those signals of what's going on in the world, you're always gonna be trying to connect the dots

...

in your approach to innovation that is in your looking backwards and catching up. And not really.

...

And I think that's, you know, perhaps one flaw that most companies

...

are inherently have without

...

perhaps even recognized in some cases. And so if you think about the work that ...my

...

company, you pop underestimate people purpose and boom are beginning to develop together around this uncheck initiative it's a really simple ideas. How do you put cultural data and professional creativity

...

into an innovation dialogue centered on the future works human side with the companies that need that type of thinking.

...

And

...

you can hire

...

hire a large

...

oh I won't use names, but you can hire a large consulting firm who

...

who says they do this kinda of work.

...

That's.

...

I have consulted the consultants,

...

and some of them do, and some of them don't. All of them think

...

that they in fact are doing it. Right, if you get them

...

alone on quiet Friday afternoon over a couple of years

...

and look at them in the eye. They kind of go ...We're

...

kind of feeling our way around it. And we really don't know what we're doing, and then you tell them ...well, actually, you know, I might have a couple of ideas,

...

Employ artists

...

There you go. They run the way screaming. They do. They do because it it doesn't it doesn't fit

...

the model of

...

their own personal advancement within the company.

...

So let let's acknowledge that that that's that's a real thing.

...

So, you know, as you as you think, yes as we think about

...

the the developing the means to bring together, versus business sectors and organizational systems

...

with artists who are also being supported, and there's a data bridge between the two to fuel the creative economy emergence after Covid as part and parcel of

...

the

...

engineering and industrial engineering sectors part of the health care sectors, part of the technology sector. The creative economy is not something that said apart from that. It's an innovation

...

skill set an apparatus the place and then could can't play and does,

...

but can't play anything bigger role in all of those other sectors. And so the science behind creativity is also clear on one thing

...

that knowledge transfer happens best

...

when development models are co created.

...

So

...

just the artist and the ...and the creative doing it just the company do it, you will get answers, and there will be some value created.

...

But in the knowledge transfer that happens

...

when both are

...

when you have models for this creation is happening together,

...

it's amazing what the potential

...

is on the horizon forest. And and think about horizons there's three horizons that I'm looking at right now. One is this

...

what is the companies that

...

were their for the arts

...

and these other sectors of business and technology and health care education, are separate from each other, maybe on parallel tracks, may respectful of each other, maybe not, but parallel tracks.

...

So separate.

...

That's one horizon, and that will be a very specific

...

outcome. There's a kind a second horizon where there is a they're still separate, but there's is a connectivity between the two. And I think we've seen some incredible examples

...

of this in the health care space over the last fifty years. Where you have, like, music therapy and art therapy,

...

those

...

types of modalities

...

have been shown to improve patient outcomes,

...

And so that's an example of how the arts and health care is a as a separate sector. They're still separate, but they're connected in in a way.

...

That

...

produces value for a stakeholder of the health care sector.

...

But then you have this third horizon where they're been companies that have figured out that the ...that a true innovation play is if we develop these full creation models,

...

where we are asking questions together and creating these feedback loops,

...

designed to help us to surface

...

the most opportunities for novel value creation that we can. And then there's no better business at. There's no better apparatus they are intended than

...

business to scale things that are that are found out. And so it's it's an exciting

...

opportunity for those that are only the into it. I think it's gonna be early adopt veteran leaned into it. You know, it's fascinating to me that no bell labs is starting to invest

...

in its experiments in art technology

...

the way that it is again, after not having done so since the late sixties when that was first introduced, they didn't

...

first the story lore is correct. Even forgot they did it for a while for ...so

...

eat were

...

very successful

...

experiments for

...

a decade normal, and then then it all kind of went fucked.

...

Yes. That's right.

...

And so and then you look at it,

...

Concern

...

it the work gets doing there, you look at the work that we're that the companies that are beginning to come as

...

to work with us in the initiative and these sick locations.

...

They're asking really different questions. So I I'm seeing an appetite for it.

...

I'm also seeing a very specific type of of leader starting to surface

...

of those host companies. They tend to be

...

And I'm gonna generalize just a bit here, but they that they tend to be

...

somewhere in the neighborhood of of

...

late thirties to mid fifties.

...

So they're not ...you know, they're not looking at retirement and and catching up.

...

In the way that some an an older

...

leader might be, and this is not an ages and thing at all, because I ...you know, I I think oh ...I think

...

people who are in there in their sixties are the next wave of entrepreneurs that are getting ready to do some amazing things in the world. I'm that that has has been demonstrated and it has been measured. Yes. Absolutely. So I'm I'm not being ages at all when I say what I'm getting ready to say, But I think that I'm also finding it that ...I've

...

I've looked at, like, what happened in two thousand and eight with the crash in America and the cities that bounce back

...

more quickly, were the cities that were predominantly not dominated by one industry, like here and, you know, like, in in some parts of the Midwest, it's a we have entire

...

veg metropolitan and service areas that are built around just one major industry.

...

But companies that have, you know, places geographies, like like Denver that have a

...

portfolio

...

of really robust

...

diverse medium

...

and small size companies that are are that are doing well. They bounce back more quickly than

...

did

...

geographies and cities that had one dominant industry. So I look for the the leader, the leader

...

of a certain age. That's a little bit more willing

...

you know, I'm closer in some ways to i'm gen z and how Gen z is thinking so they they understand that because that's their kids.

...

They're they understand some of these concepts intuitively so the cell is not as hard, and they've still got enough runway left in their career. They understand that being an early adopt or if you place your bet

...

correct is is a really good career move as a as a leader of a company.

...

And they're in cities that have a a robust

...

ecosystem of ...I'm finding that if if if there's a couple of things like that that are in play,

...

that's where I'm looking to plant the the seeds of creativity with this initiative. Because I think those are where the the most right potential is.

...

Where we're coming up against

...

limits of

...

at time and and

...

polite

...

But

...

perhaps just as a closing

...

closing

...

note,

...

it

...

just came to me this this quote from a fellow by name of the Vinci.

...

Some five hundred years ago, if you if you recall,

...

the artist sees what others can only glimpse.

...

You think a business would be businesses would be falling over each other to see what artists see

...

around the corner.

...

Yet, this is a very slow and painful process. It has to do

...

with lots of

...

psychological mechanisms rather than business mechanisms.

...

And indeed, maybe on another occasion, I will tell you how

...

it was demonstrated to me that business is ninety percent psychology,

...

and it was demonstrated to me via by an accomplished comments

...

that's a a a different story.

...

But if we ...if we assume

...

that one of the greatest meta crises

...

today is

...

this wicked terminal,

...

almost terminal lack of imagination,

...

then the way towards opening opening up people's imagination

...

leads squarely

...

through a territory with which artists are intimately familiar even if they don't necessarily carry a map of it. They know what it feels like and they know

...

how to work

...

with what they find that. In know to get new?

...

Productive ideas,

...

and that's

...

strategic business value right there. Yeah. You you said the word ...the magic word there they know what it feels like. And if you think about

...

I'm not gonna go into this because we're at the top of they hour, but the experience economy, it's all about

...

the feeling of an experience

...

as economic value. And so I think that is what you said is beautifully aligned with that. And ...it also sparked

...

quote I remember by James Baldwin,, I hope I get this ...right.

...

That the purpose of art is to lay bare

...

the questions,

...

which have been hidden by the answers.

...

Man had way with words. That's for sure.

...

Indeed.

...

To admins. Thank you very much indeed for your time. It

...

seems I'm going have to drag you into the bar studio

...

again,

...

sometimes soon to perhaps even talk about

...

experience economy and how that is

...

shaping

...

the larger economies

...

around the world.

...

And what we might be able to

...

learn from this process and and how we might be able to contribute

...

to making it.

...

More human. Shall we say

...

theo Evans artist,

...

creative entrepreneur

...

educator,

...

and the general creative trouble maker coming to us from Reveal in Kentucky,

...

this has been

...

the

...

global studio.

...

We will hear you

...

live

...

more or less this time.

...

Next Friday,

...

And, of course, please do

...

hop into the into the landing page

...

for chat

...

dot com

...

what's slash raft

...

where this thing will be published very shortly. And, of course, do, please

...

visit us at Boba dot global.

...

To check out what we're up to..

...

Thanks very much again, and have a great afternoon.

...

Thanks, Ralph ralph. I enjoyed it.

Fortune Cookie