The Future of Entertainment is Interactive

The Future of Entertainment is Interactive.

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The future of entertainment is interactive.

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...

Good afternoon.

...

stem education.

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as being the focus of investment and

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development, the world over with much being made

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of what are

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technologically enabled societies will require the future by way of

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scientists

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engineers, and mathematicians

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in some countries, emphasis on stem,

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has resulted in an exclusion.

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of large parts of the fields of humanities in the ads from curriculum.

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somehow, I don't think

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It's healthy. In fact,

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creating the arts and humanities

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to libraries and museums is downright right, dangerous.

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Don't Take it from me. Take it from Tom Peters.

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one of the greatest business theorists out there

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thumb a terrific conversation on Twitter.

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where he posted just the other day,

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statement

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the liberal arts are the bedrock

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successful contributing

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businesses.

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and of quote

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if we are indeed at all interested as we should be in the

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building companies and organizations that

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contribute

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to the well being of stuff.

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of customers.

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community and ultimately of

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humanity. We need to

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add a to that highly prized education.

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we need steam and not just stem.

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of course, we've seen this before.

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arts and humanities are of strategic importance.

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and not just a nice to have.

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to discuss the the stress strategies,

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around steam education and the value

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stream education in in general,

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as well as the way to

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and creative

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and how they think in the very specific

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I've asked into the go studio.

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today at the Elements.

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The is

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associate dean for disciplinary research

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and innovation of the college of apps and media.

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at the university of colorado in Denver, that is a

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that is a hell of a mouthful, but

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I assure you it is worth every every single vaglio and

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and consonant.

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And here's a partner with Barack global.

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in a new initiative very much in that space where business

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and art me

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meet

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Now, theo apparently is having a few.

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technical difficulties.

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connecting. So I'm glad to say that with is

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also, my my friend, laura,

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so is an educator linguist

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and a thinker on matters, personal development,

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and and executive education,

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And I I'm rather hoping that

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Leo is going to hop onto the stage, and join me here.

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to have a chat about

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the strategic value of steam education wealthier,

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is we have putting the the right levers and getting getting his technology sorted out.

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Welcome to birth both of you, Leo,

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and

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They.

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to obama, I the theo up on stage outstanding.

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Welcome again.

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Good morning.

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Hello.

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Oh, it's great to have you birth.

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Tell,

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does business need the us

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I'll a in here. So I I think

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doesn't it need the arts? The answer is an artist.

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because artists are the ones who produce the arts. And so

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a little context, I think, maybe helpful and answer

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that question. So in in most of my work, I focus on the future of work.

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the future is already here. And really, more more time about future work we're keen into

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the integration of of humans and machines machine learning,

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in in the workplace and what we all do to get

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to get our economy going and to get nation's moving every day.

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this in some ways, it's not a

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future conversation in some ways it's a his historical conversation.

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one of the

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narrative economist, robert sc from Yale,

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has looked at some really interesting studies. And one of the

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most talked about things in the nineteen twenties and newspapers were how

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machines were willing to replace humans. So

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this is a conversation that is not new in some ways. It's it's really old, and that's

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comforting because in his territory, we've been navigated navigating for a very long time.

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so then the question becomes in the future of work now that we

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are trying to figure out

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artificial intelligence, augmented and intelligence,

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and how humans interact with that. We have to

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culture very much so because the same human bias

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that we have in our society, so Just way into the programming name. One of the

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people that has been very influential on me is a academic

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His name is Margaret Bo, who has looked at this intersection between creativity of

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a few of humans and where the limits are an artificial

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and I'm gonna intelligence. And so these are very

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big conversations, but a lot of very smart

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much smarter than I have been working on them for for ages and agents. So

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we're part of an ongoing conversation of humanity.

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that's quite rich shows a lot of potential and a lot of promise

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And I think artists are going to increasingly play a part of that

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artists are also interested in these questions just like all humans are.

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It's interesting that birth here actually and and

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they are or have been practicing artists to a

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one degree or another time

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other gigs allowing

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this.

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Kim

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can

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this this propensity to to create

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is is something that is, of course, deeply human, And but somehow,

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despite the fact that all business is by

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by its nature creative,

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that that activity is still viewed with some some

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Hello.

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suspicion. Leo, you were going to to jump in with the ...with with the comment

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Yes.

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I do hear a lot about that conversation in the few

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so off work.

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but

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Maybe I'll just throw in the complete opposite

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I think because I'm I'm actually doing i'm a bit

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doing a bit of research for a thing I'm writing around

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trade education in the middle ages, you know, when you had

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traveling journey men and and things like that.

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Exactly.

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and

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a apprenticeship and master and master apprenticeship relations

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chips and such things.

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Yeah. And I'm thinking almost like

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I think it probably was created very much connect

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it at some point where you could not just really

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you know, kind of that that was probably a rather fluid continuum, you know, where the

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crossed kind of maybe to then turned into the artist.

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which, obviously, I mean, it's not going to

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big discussion what's off. Oh, what's wrong? But

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I ...like, my my thesis would be that that was probably

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all much more connected. And then at some point, we soon

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artificially cut that all off.

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And now we're trying to su smoothly

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staple it back together.

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So maybe we need to go back

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Be interesting to consider what what

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what point we actually did do this. This this

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cutting off. But seeing as you're going back to the middle ages, maybe people we we should actually

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reach

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even further back in history, wilson

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the great biologist has argued with

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substantial evidence

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that artistic innovation mirrors,

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a closely genetic innovation.

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and it's therefore super extremely important to the very different

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of what it means to be human. If it's so important,

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why are so many people in leadership positions somewhere between

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dismissive and terrified of it there and the ideas is.

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Yep.

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Many the

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you know, I think they're ...just i'll speak generally and then specifically,

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I think

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kind of a at the core of this is since we're coming grounding things in history,

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I think we ...let's let's

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think about the romantic. Playing a lot of or

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temporary.

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executives view of creativity, and they're they're about the artist who

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are often looked at as per of creativity

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temporary society although we find it across

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science and engineering It's everywhere. It's to basic

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aspect of human intelligence, but they're obey

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come along at the enlightenment when we had science and arts

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says we always was kinda of talking about is sitting very nicely

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together and and being viewed as different aperture

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to which to engage and understand human experience.

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And then the romantic come along and in the book in that cambridge handbook book,

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creativity. There's a beautiful historical section that looks at this.

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all of a sudden, the notion of creativity

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kind of gets separated out into this almost

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deity kinda realm, you know, like, in the beginning, god

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The years, the news is having the their lovely chats into

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he is right?

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the muse, you know, in in the

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christian tradition in the beginning God created.

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And so then the mechanics come along, and then we have

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you know, a a conversation starting around

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mental illness and creativity. And that was very much promoted as

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you know, these were outsiders. These were people who are mentally yelling And I think in some ways,

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that that notion of creativity very much around today. And so, the

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executive things. Creativity is great, and I understand it, but I wanna be able

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to control it because I don't wanna efficiency to suffer and

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the version of creativity that I understand that's out there in the world is

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something that's going to negatively impact my efficiency and in the Western world.

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we are all about efficiency. And so they tried

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to implement versions of creativity that is

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without the requisite freedom that

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creativity actually requires and so they get, you know, these watered down versions and the

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say well, that program didn't work. We tried it. And so I think we're ...you know, there's there's a lot of

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experiences like this that are in the collective imagination of business leadership.

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that were still very much doing with today. So I think

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as we move forward, finding new ways to express these thoughts

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to tell the stories and to

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engage artists who are also working in data science

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and social change in other areas that are really powerful

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in combination with some of the other skills of the future world of work.

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it it's a ...you know, it's a it's a

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evolutionary moment in what could happen

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whether it does or not Still a question.

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It's it's interesting that you should

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delve down that particular path comes to mind.

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recent development.

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the the otherwise entirely rational

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internationally respected and generally likes and admires

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You uk government.

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right.

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has just recently announced cuts

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to funding for art, and humanity is

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education in England. I

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I guess the

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Up the

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highly paid advisors were paid to not

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look at the economic output

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of of the creative sector, and that is somewhat

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of a passing passing question considering that

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the the cuts will amount

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to twenty three million pounds.

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which might sound like a lot of money.

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But in the context of the education, I assure you it's not

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And in the context of the output of

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Britain's creative sector

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it's kind of interesting because that amounts to about

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eighteen million pounds.

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per day.

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So

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how can you call this

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Shall we say,

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Politely, interesting slash and burn campaign.

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through the heart of

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but is designed making television and so on and so forth.

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And this is, you know, this is not a unique British.

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problem.

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somehow, it's not just being a business executive.

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who is terrified

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of letting the crazy creative, and it also is the politician

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I think fear might have something

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to do with that.

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No kidding.

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and not

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not really

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not really lighting it improperly. So when you formulate the question about

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along the lines of what's stopping the executives

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or you know, those the business leaders to go there?

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my first reaction was

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They probably haven't slept enough.

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if they're probably not hydrated properly,

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they might need a toilet break that calendar that has been out of whack for

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twenty minutes each hour since seven Am in the morning.

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So just just generally sit down chill out for a minute, bro and think about

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things Right?

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it specifically be human, like, allow yourself

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to be human, like, everything comes in those tiny other things.

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everything has a price tag. I mean, if you hire a lawyer, it's literally like the

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is running by the minute of five five minutes or whatever the

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The chunking size is

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that's what everything gets measured by it. And

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and odd is very

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wonderfully revolutionary end up. It just

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refuses to

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to do that.

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which is noise, but also scary.

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It's interesting that you should you should say you should say measure that because

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one of the challenges

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throw that, you know, people like people like us,

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proponents of arts humanities as having

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strategic value of a business and society. Not just

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aesthetics and strategic value.

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is how do you know? How can you measure any of this?

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it's immeasurable and and therefore, it's not important.

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Therefore, I don't want it.

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It's not quite right. That the how is it? I mean, you actually it turns out you

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can measure this stuff.

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Yes. There's almost nothing that science

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can't measure. I think that

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the the the bigger question is measured in context

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too quiet. So what is the barometer against which we're measuring something? So

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The way I'm thinking about it these days is

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really looking at in ...let's keeping the business context

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because I think once you step out into kind of

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more of a general plural society, that come slightly

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conversation. But in a in a business context,

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and and a longer one, too,

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And and i a much number one was with which

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there are no

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Mhmm.

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good Kpis. So show shall we say that everybody has a great

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it.

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So but in the business context when we think about

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stay in the future or for a moment. Yeah, you know,

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one thing is clear that humans are increasingly gonna have to endeavor

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toward integration and augmentation with machines in

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in figuring out how to do that in a way that leverages the best of both.

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in order order to optimize organizational performance because that's the nature of business.

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And so the skill domains have gotta be cultivated.

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I am

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in a way that can be generally agree to. It can

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received by those within the domain business.

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And so generally speaking, I think that those probably fall into kinda of four

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rough areas right now, digital cognitive self leadership and person.

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And so with many of these skills domains, they resonate

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intuitively with all of us at at a meta level,

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but a one size to fits all approach is not gonna be sufficient.

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to leverage the cumulative capacity of an organization's diverse

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stakeholder groups so we start, you know, thinking about how these apply across

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the board, in the Us context, you know, to

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black employees or to Latin employees or Lgbt employees.

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because all of those inform a

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our identities, are cultural identities

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to some degree, media how we make meaning in the world.

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And so if you take, for example,

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creativity. It's got a cognitive a personal and leadership implication.

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in its skill development. And even though it's a aspect of general human intelligence,

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we have great groups like the baby lab at Penn State.

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that are looking at the neuro neuroscience aspects of creativity,

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creativity should also be understood as a soc cultural interaction.

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and there is where I think a lot of businesses

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get really nervous about how do we measure that internally within a business because

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when you think about social cultural interactions of creativity that's conceptual thinking, that's

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reception memory or reflect self

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Mhmm

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criticism, which businesses is notoriously not

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great.

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and and so creativity as a skill set,

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suggest that is both individual neuro scientific

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and culturally mediated. So how do you kind grapple with that? Well,

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Where do you put the maker?

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Yeah. Where do you put the meter. And so I think that

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This is where the the trans disciplinary nature of work

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comes in. And so it makes sense when understanding this context that a

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scientist, a business operations leader

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and an artist

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all have potentially

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different pieces of the puzzle. Definitely when put together

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you know, equate to something that

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becomes a workable measure in a way that can be understood by different

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audiences and different stakeholder groups because no employee

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is just an employee. Right? We we've seen this, for example, in

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wellness for the eight to twelve billion dollars that gets best

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they a website wellness programs.

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there is not a lot of research that

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actually, work yeah.

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says that these programs actually work and yet, we're bill

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Yeah. So we're we're building cottage industry around things that

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you know, I I don't wanna generalize too much here, but seem largely

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formative to make leadership feel good that they're doing something

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for their employees will being with the employee when you

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boxes boxes have been picked

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it's all good. Let's move on. Right.

...

Yeah. But when you look at the data,

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it's not it's not working. So we have to take a step back and and ask ourselves

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how does this cultural aspect of our organization that's

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clearly impacting our employees. How does that cultural aspect?

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in culture change management, which often sits and

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human resources, which is that quasi legal risk mitigation area of an organism

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station. How does that work?

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connect to the innovation agendas we have in a company, which often sit in a different part of the company.

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so bridging that becomes the work

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the data and the measurements said of how do we, you know, what how we create

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measures that allow us to know if this culture change management is actually

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in our innovation and vice versa in creating kind of a virtuous feed between tube.

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There is an interesting problem

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here, I think a business

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deals with the conscious or says it deals with the conscious

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while up,

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deals with the subconscious

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a lot of the time, if not most,

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where can we build bridges

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this is not an easy question to answer.

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Leo or what are you learning for for your work?

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I think

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I'm going to go like full psychological here. I think

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sad integration.

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I think figuring out what are the bit

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that we are seeing

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what are the unintended consequences of of our actions?

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Would you mind just giving us

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a tiny brief introduction

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for the benefit who are not familiar with the concept of

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the psychological shadow what does that

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actually in parallel. How does it work?

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It's basically it's the part of ourselves.

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that we don't like very much and therefore pretend it doesn't exist.

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And then that path, occasionally,

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pops up

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at the most in appropriate times when it gets

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ignored for too long and bricks have.

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Is it like the the Harry's Hairy sweaty beast of the mythological realm?

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It is pretty much thoughtful a lot of

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I think a lot of those myths are really about

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reclaiming that part of yourself. You know, it's kind of like when the

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princess kisses the frog and the

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transforms into a prince. So there are two sides

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where, you know, the bit we like, the pit life to see and the it we don't.

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and then we kind of

...

Exactly.

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it's still the same person. It's just ...he just looks kind of different. Right?

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Yeah. He just looks a bit

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prince in his frog, and it just becomes a bit more of an anti

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right to

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person. And I think similar things

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could be true for businesses and organizations.

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where as part of just just how we make culture

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there are we consciously do in bits we look at, and therefore other bits

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we don't look at that are kind of the the polar opposite

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that could be worse, occasionally inviting to the table, and I

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autistic ways could help

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stitch stuck back together.

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How without going the full robert bla or

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Joseph Campbell.

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how do we

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actually make not so much make peace actually, how do

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to integrate that hearing sweaty, beast of creative.

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energy that is sometimes uncomfortable.

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enter the into the business psyche. Is it even

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I mean, are we aiming too high? As it even possible?

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whether it's possible or not, is maybe not as interest

...

a question of part are the implications of how it's happening

...

day because in ...yeah, does that talk with corporate

...

leaders and see sweet leaders. One of the things that

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opens up the conversation more than anything is when they think

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value is being left on the table and value often in in this context.

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obviously, in a capitalist study equates to money.

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And in the the other thing that

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leans them into is is there something that puts him at risk?

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So when we think about some of these

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and I'm I'm not familiar with all of the things that that

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is referencing, but just my understanding of this kind of

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shadow psychology piece of herself. It already finds its way yet. So

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put service to my mind as a little

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Oh, it it it does that whether we like it or not.

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whether we like it or not and and so there's some, you know,

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examples that we can point to. So the first

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you know, see they've come to mind or Mit

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fairly recent recall of its eighty million tan images initiative.

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So the the bias and society. So it's how do we

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you know, load in visual images,

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and collect all of the ways that people describe those images

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to make suggestions.

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when people put something into a Google search engine, for example,

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And so they had they've had to recall their It has

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their biggest project around this because of this

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things that humans were programming in to describe the images

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we're were subject to the human interpretation of those things.

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you look at autonomous cars and how the bias in society

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that sinners on often centers and stake in the Us context

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what I understand in the best often centers on whiteness.

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so autonomous cars, you know, aren't

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the ai and m doesn't even read black skin and same thing in medical devices.

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And so as we influence

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So the influence, I guess, I have a very collective culture.

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has behavioral biases built into it, and those are both positive and negative.

...

and managing through that

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is is a business and leadership imperative

...

that is important because organizations are create that are

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as we see them increasingly relying on algorithm data driven decision making.

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it's an apparent information just take those active approach accounting for this culturally induced to bias

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because if they don't, and they are putting together strategy and operational that matrix

...

insights to guide their decision making, they may be in a early privilege

...

privilege. One historically dominant squirrel view, Dominant Greek worldview in

...

no way that is out of step with where the world is going. And

...

So blind spots at scale

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blind spots at scale. Let's take something that

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already flawed and make it not work.

...

at a bigger

...

scale. Yeah.

...

Chocolate.

...

sounds look like, a

...

product problem, a marketing problem, and ultimately a legal problem

...

So is risk mitigation

...

right the right way in for a different kind of thinking

...

into corporations. I mean

...

one of the main worries, of course, is am I going to be able to attract the right

...

fires. I mean, they the competition for Talent is

...

is is is is hot out there. Am I going to be able to

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of smart my product.

...

competitors. All those questions

...

really tracing the week from from the the eyelids of

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most business executives out there every day.

...

are we going to be seeing more corporations

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opening the that that their boardroom doors to artists

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to come in and say, we don't know

...

how you run your business, and we really don't care, but we'll we can help you with.

...

as ways to think differently.

...

just like the old old apple

...

apple

...

is to say,

...

you know, I think a really interesting place that I'm marching around that question

...

is as Gen z,

...

back in twenty twenty five, that's gonna be twenty percent

...

bar workforce in the Us, and so I I'm watching them in one of the

...

in more interesting conversations that I'm having some folks there.

...

are, yes, They're digital natives in when we see that how that negatively

...

they're well being and so forth. But when you think about them in the workplace context,

...

as a employee stakeholder group. They're are coming in with a different set of

...

skills and expectations that have been on

...

than have been on business millennials

...

or Genes x and and, you know, certainly like boomers, And so the implications of that

...

we often tend to focus on the on the negative. But one of the things that I've

...

seen about Gen z that I think is really interested in that I'm watching is

...

unlike millennials and Jim x.

...

Genes z had they highly value creativity, but they are

...

seem to be cording in the research somewhat

...

afraid of the freedom that comes along with that creativity, but there ...but they are

...

reaching toward it in some really interesting ways.

...

The second thing that they value highly

...

is social justice environmental justice. Well,

...

unlike millennial and Gen x, that aspect

...

of delayed gratification that social justice

...

often requires because it is such a long term

...

large scale societal shift.

...

actually isn't probably training them to think about

...

delayed gratification and wait and it's sticking to the work of it.

...

in ways that are really profound when you

...

pair that with their experience they've had as digital natives.

...

and the collapse of time and distance between them

...

and cultures are in cultural ideas around the world. So

...

as they get enter into the workplace, the way that they're entering into and

...

finding creativity on their terms is more commentary

...

in bridging cultural ideas together.

...

instead of exploring cultural you know, creativity within the

...

specifically defined domain, and then the experience of working

...

word social justice has is really training them to have a much

...

longer view of things. And so there their strategies in their

...

temporal constructs of innovation. I think are gonna are gonna revolutionize

...

business in in the

...

starting very in the very near term so that I found that to be really exciting.

...

Leo, your experience has been mostly with

...

people, I guess,

...

older than then Gen z, But

...

how does

...

how does it harder does your experience fit into it into this context?

...

I would be radical and say the artists are already here. You just

...

force them into hiding. You as been

...

floral new big organization because I mean, that would imply

...

everybody who holds the job now isn't an artist.

...

and the artist are all kind of out there waiting to come in.

...

out the bang for blood. Yeah.

...

like, we did

...

recently, So I I do some work for a learning consulting

...

and we recently a session on

...

don't know it was mono those international

...

days of something

...

and

...

they figured out that there is a really high percentage

...

of people who do something completely different as a day or published

...

also. So we did like a whole book show and tell

...

And I think a lot of organizations

...

already half. It's just people might Either literally never know because it

...

doesn't come up. It's not part of someone's role. It's not vaglio.

...

youth and again, people are overworked and barely have time for life.

...

it's not in the job description.

...

Mhmm.

...

exactly. Like, who told you to do this blue who

...

You know? So I think the office are already there. I think you need to

...

make a bit more space for that.

...

also possibly

...

allow portfolio careers not every role just because we've done that

...

so far, and we seem to want to fit things into

...

forty hours divided by five days or whatever the regular

...

i'll where people are face.

...

That doesn't mean you have to. You know, maybe somebody wants to work

...

three or four days and do some other stuff in the other time.

...

and maybe that's actually

...

really useful for the main employer because they essentially get a lot of

...

free r and d time that that person is doing and just bringing all the

...

fruits and

...

benefits and practice and

...

vi back to the other organization.

...

So I think people just need to be a bit more flexible and actually just let

...

the people be that

...

speaking of of r and d.

...

the process of making art means

...

making progress through experimentation and a lot of trial in there

...

an artist

...

begins with an idea for the final work, but

...

But getting from the idea to that final work is a

...

in a process that involves a lot of patient experimenting

...

and

...

it seems to me that the value of patient experimenting needs to be

...

Or the reach of push basic experimenting needs to be

...

broad in organizations. It needs to

...

leave

...

R and d departments, and and it needs to become the domain of

...

anybody who wants to do that?

...

simply because it's going to speed up

...

the process of each organization as

...

you know, as an entity.

...

are you saying examples of this kind of thinking to know have you actually come across?

...

corporations that

...

that value

...

people's hobbies beyond

...

than being hobbies, for instance,

...

Yes.

...

Yes. Yeah. That there's examples of it ever everywhere. How do you system?

...

is that in a way that

...

operationalize it as a as a mode of

...

of working, I think is a is a

...

is a more complicated question that it's

...

to pay most of my time because I I I ...in my work,

...

new researching and science that tend to be

...

lean on the ...how do we put put in empirical quantitative measures

...

some of this stuff is ...because I the kinda

...

coming from, you know, thirty, forty years as it

...

as an artist, I know that there is the capacity of artists to do all of these things.

...

So how do we ...how do we open those doors and operation them in the way that is

...

relevant to different industries and and so forth

...

so the St project ralph,

...

what you were talking about that comes to mind is as a way to

...

began intentionally experimenting with

...

some of those concepts that were here in the question that you post.

...

And with the and with sal,

...

And the name comes from

...

the book by invest Matthew Bars and, the power of giving away

...

power and he talks about

...

pyramid mindset, which enforce hierarchy, and that's

...

how most of our higher education that's how most of our

...

corporations are run today, But consulate

...

top down stuff.

...

top downs stuff because it ...because at

...

it's very essence. It offers

...

a form of security from, you know, from the outside world.

...

it's it's about commanding and control, but it does offer a formal of security.

...

But then there in his book he talks about there is another

...

option, and alternative it to that in constellation mindset.

...

and as opposed to pyramids, which offer a kind of a freedom from

...

something constellation mindset offer freedom wet so each

...

each per each store in consolation acting in concert with others based on kind of share

...

set of principles, habit cinnamon, in this kind of

...

freedom with

...

office choice and autonomy

...

and it's a different kind of security instability. And so

...

feel if you look at what's happening, you our streets around the world,

...

If you look at what's happening in companies,

...

people are really trying to understand how diversity equity and inclusion

...

What is the role they should play in business? And what is the role they are currently?

...

already played in business and how do we reconcile those two things? And I think this idea moving some pyramid

...

to constellation minus becomes a effective tool for talking about that. So

...

the name was Stella this initiative that were x

...

tuning over the next year or so with Bo,

...

that's where that name Stella comes from.

...

the pace of cultural change that we're experiencing is

...

unlike anything we've ever seen before in human history, but largely because of the

...

technology has

...

collapsed time and distance between people largely. And so

...

if you begin going back into kind of the neuroscience, what we see in the Gen z folks

...

is they are instead of

...

I'm I'm Gene genetics, some fifty one. So were my generations

...

or these domains of knowledge in our brains

...

Gents aren't doing that in the same boy. They're storing maps.

...

to the knowledge that are been augmented intelligence with their

...

you know smart devices. And so I as we look at that, I think it becomes a very exciting prophecy

...

to think about how things that are personal passions

...

hobbies maybe ...yeah. Another way to even look at them.

...

how do those become skill sets that are utilized?

...

to advance human society, especially in the world of business.

...

these are big questions that I don't think there are great answers for, but I think there are some additional

...

experiments that are beginning to go go on around those

...

of things. And when you think about the size and potential of that,

...

If you look at the Fortune five hundreds, their corporate social responsibility,

...

activities equated to about twenty billion dollars

...

in twenty nineteen d and i consulting is another eight billion dollars

...

late global leadership consulting is a fifty billion dollar

...

industry Corporate works out wellness programs eight billion dollars.

...

So we're seeing large sums of money spent

...

asking these questions of systems, what becomes

...

a more challenging proposition is

...

how do we begin deploying some of that capital into these intentional experiments?

...

that leverages the brilliance of human creativity with and

...

intelligence to say, what does this look

...

like, if we do this in the manufacturing industry and the logistics and

...

in the health care industry. And those are our intentional experiments that are starting to bubble up

...

I think it's early based on that.

...

Well, saying us we've started chatting about the the with stella

...

project

...

Let's let's continue down that path because it is something that is that is

...

particularly close to my hat, obviously, but I think on, you know,

...

a larger scale. It actually has importance

...

Not just in business, but

...

going to have societal

...

ripples

...

if you will in that in that one of the key questions,

...

that

...

we are enabling

...

are hoping to enable

...

Ceo toe to to ask of themselves.

...

is how do I change my thinking?

...

So I can so I can change the thinking of my executives

...

So together, we can change the thinking of everyone in the company.

...

So we may get over the obstacles and challenges.

...

that Are ahead of us did

...

constant learning and learning for people etcetera Etcetera all in the context of

...

of the social issues and and of climate change.

...

Leaders

...

need help in all this. Right?

...

they do in rob about K k,

...

an artist who gave an incredible bow talk

...

in Paris right before the pandemic.

...

key kind of puts ...could it forth this proposition can

...

can you live the best story you can tell? So if you think of about, I think that's a power

...

question because when you think about it in business context, Kim businesses live the best story their people can

...

tell. Ultimately, that's the goal of a inclusion is to unlock that latent

...

opacity that is found in the brilliance of the

...

people that businesses are hiring, but how to do that?

...

is not going to be relegated to just one simple answer

...

I forgets who exactly said this quote, but but it's

...

kind of wonderful for every complex problem. There's an answer that is clear, simple

...

and wrong.

...

Mister Mu,

...

And yes. Yes. That's right. Henry remember

...

can And and so when you think about that context,

...

this is a a paradigm shift that, I think

...

contemporary leadership is going to have to

...

have to grapple with on its own

...

the round boston answers. Right?

...

there are no more simple answers. And and, perhaps they're never were. We just

...

we tended to invest in things that look like simple answers.

...

like wellness said is not really working.

...

and when even when you think about, like, things like ally ship,

...

ally ship of the Lgbt community

...

black lives matter, which has been, you know, very big and important in the Us.

...

some of the work

...

that my company, you pop under underestimate people of purpose have done

...

we we kinda of probe and incorrectly in this ship question. While, the

...

the allies are receiving a pro social pro well being bump from a

...

identify themselves as an allies, but in the data, we see that

...

very little of that ally ship.

...

and the benefits of ally are annoying to the correct

...

with who the ally is saying I'm an ally of. And so

...

when you think about performative business,

...

we're at a waters moment and with Covid and with the racial justice recommending,

...

here in the Us, that conversation has accelerated and I think in a really

...

wonderful ways

...

for innovation because I think it opens up new opportunities because it makes

...

mental models somewhat fluid in the way we

...

came into some twenty twenty with. And so when you think about these

...

types of things. What Stella is is attempting to det

...

stand up a demonstration project.

...

that has a a

...

a mission of

...

using cultural data analytics.

...

and putting in the hands of professional artists who

...

understand how to do a lot of the experiential learning

...

methods that businesses looking for, how do you put those two things together.

...

to help an organization understand how to intentionally align its cultural change management.

...

with its generation strategies. So that requires

...

the data, but it also requires someone like a artist who has great

...

experience in experiential learning modalities who can help business

...

just do this. And with this administration palette across Boston,

...

New Orleans Atlanta,

...

and Denver in Brooklyn, we're gonna be pulling all of that works

...

through working and it's a portfolio approach and the different host

...

companies and the different types of artists. It looks really different in every single one of those cities.

...

and we'll be pulling all of that through in

...

in in the fall of this year. And

...

writing it up in the spring of next year and then and

...

summer of twenty two. We're planning a global future of creativity summit

...

here in denver that we'll be inviting scientists

...

and business leaders and artists and technology engineering folks

...

two

...

all who have an interest in understanding creativity in the business content.

...

the creativity view both as a psychological process as well as a

...

cultural interaction between the individual and

...

their environment. And this idea is

...

is one that is

...

is already being seen in some ways in different

...

companies like men Labs, and I know where out you not talked about this before.

...

with their experiments in art technology program, They are looking at

...

center intersection. You look at Lucerne and Switzerland,

...

they you're looking at this intersection between data analytics

...

science and then experiential modalities that artists can break to the table to

...

grapple with and and turn data into

...

into something that people can more readily understand. So at the end of the day, it's

...

really a translation challenge that we're all facing because in trans

...

work, research science, etcetera.

...

we have to do the translation and often, those

...

translation takes time

...

and time takes time. And that's the one thing we can't manufacture

...

and I think that with the way that we fund a lot of our research and development

...

endeavors both in the academy as well as in

...

the corporate space. We're not really funding.

...

the translation process that is required to get to the good stuff, And I think that

...

for my money, I'm betting on artist to be able to help to figure out

...

what that equation is in a way that can be widely adopted.

...

And then with the Stella project, hopefully, what we're gonna lead to is use

...

foundation for establishing a global artist to business innovation platform.

...

that can help companies across all kinds of different sectors.

...

an organization on apologies be able to do this work on a systematic basis and employee

...

the artist to have been trained to use the cultural how to do so.

...

This is the global studio is rough home, and I'm here with

...

Admins in Denver and aloha

...

in right what way talking about

...

strategic value.

...

of steam education

...

in the specific

...

and the value of art and artists

...

to business and organizations in the more

...

general

...

creativity

...

among other things is about making mental leaps.

...

bait in terms of

...

pure imagination or connecting of connected dots and

...

matching of patterns.

...

and artists understand

...

innovating through

...

iterating nicely.

...

are they therefore just better and faster innovators?

...

We are part of your thoughts.

...

And think

...

I think the or on mute

...

Yeah.

...

she mute.

...

Sorry. Softer the innovators without access to the

...

How good is that?

...

awesome Brilliant,

...

I think that's true. I think there is something about

...

just the familiarity

...

with a process like that and how you beard it in

...

and how very much it's not

...

you start from point a, you have a straight line and you landed point b

...

and the

...

the trust that you will land somewhere and it'll will probably be interesting and

...

find something out.

...

the willingness to be wrong and for stuff just be

...

just not work out at all. I recently learned paper making

...

and very often there's just a lot of luck and stuff to clean up, and it's

...

There's a hell lot of a lot of good that happens right?

...

Oh god Yeah. And I think it just need to be

...

I think you get over time. You get more and more okay with the goo.

...

Yeah.

...

We have we have a few a few quality humans listening in

...

Quality humans, if you wish to throw something into the pod,

...

these by means.

...

raise hand and what

...

throw the microphone in your general direction.

...

swinging swinging it back around to to, you know, Wilson

...

and biology.

...

and and evolution

...

the parallel strikes me.

...

as being somewhat elegant, earlier,

...

very small proportion of genetic mutations are successful as we know. Right?

...

nature tries lots of things. Most of them don't work.

...

that's over time.

...

they build up

...

and I build up buildup up

...

the changes in who we are and and how we are

...

which is exactly what layout just described.

...

Sorry.

...

if

...

managers are instead

...

forever stuck.

...

in the sort of replicating mode without imitating, this going to be

...

ignored by history.

...

and to counter the process, they have to learn

...

to trust the simple truth that most experiments fail

...

but over time, the process

...

and experimentation creates a better reality. That's

...

That's the creative process in know not nutshell. Isn't it?

...

there's three

...

specific thoughts at surface as you were talking me about. One is i make

...

when it comes to the artist,

...

identity artist persona.

...

I think we have an obligation to be i that a little bit.

...

most of the popular

...

media talks about, you know, the Artist Identity as being independent bug some kind of match

...

in inspiration moment.

...

And when in in reality, what the science tells us is that it's

...

it's not that at all. It's an accumulation.

...

of resources lived experience.

...

motive personal motivations, solving things that are interesting to them.

...

and skill sets that are developed over time that allows

...

them the artist. Me the artist to you, the artist

...

to see something that others have missed because of this unique not combination of skills motivations

...

resources.

...

hop hold that thought. Hold that out. If i if I'm just cutting in for a second because

...

a quote that which I keep bringing bringing up

...

because it illustrates this very point.

...

so elegantly, and I've got it ...I've got it sitting here on my desk.

...

and it comes from the painter and photographer chuck close.

...

and some people may have come across it

...

because it has been published a number of times.

...

and it goes like this inspiration.

...

is for amateurs.

...

the rest of us just show up and get to work.

...

if you wait, if you wait around for the clouds to part and a boat of lightning to

...

strike you in the brain. You are not going to make an awful lot of work.

...

all the best ideas come out of the process.

...

they come

...

out of the work itself. That's precisely what you're talking about. Right?

...

it is because they're, you know, for a lot of

...

for a lot of for a lot of folks who who don't spend

...

regular time, practicing skill. There's nothing that

...

scary as a blank page or blank canvas. But for

...

for many of us who have devoted years and years

...

to the the practice of

...

of exploring the creative process, you know, visually or in writing or film.

...

what we discover is that we have just learned to trust

...

the freedom that that comes along with that exploration knowing that

...

there there's maybe no such thing as a failure, but it's

...

just another data point that's going to spark another idea, and you learn to trust that over time.

...

And so when we think about innovation culture that has been

...

in business context. So focused on failure as a virtue,

...

in some ways that that aligns with the artist process, but in other otherwise, it's deeply problematic.

...

because in this from a social counter standpoint, it is the question

...

white decisions or straight males who get to benefit

...

from the audacity of being able to celebrate their constant failure.

...

in business as a virtue. When you consider if you're a the only black

...

woman in a boardroom full of white men,

...

that same notion of

...

of the celebrating failure is a different context for

...

you may not

...

that executive that it is for many and change

...

may not get the next twenty million to go, go play again. Right?

...

That's exactly right. And

...

So what's really interesting in in the research around around this is that

...

we know what that specific

...

version of innovation looks like because of the questions that get asked

...

the data set of the, you know, the kind of the mark Zuckerberg types of the world.

...

But what is also really interesting in the

...

in the in the science around this, is that your cultural identity

...

media the questions you're gonna ask of any data set. And so

...

what else exists, you know, when we think about diversity equity equation that's

...

a way to open up new products, new markets, entirely new business

...

to models because the questions that a

...

Latin x lesbian in role

...

Colorado, for example, may ask of a data said

...

going to be radically different. Than Mark Zuckerberg,

...

the value create

...

of the same up

...

of the same dataset. Right?

...

of the of the same data set. And so when we think about creating value in the world,

...

there's more than one type of value that ...and so I think there's a there's

...

what I am really excited about is the opportunity that

...

the the events in the Us context of the last year around diversity equity and inclusion.

...

that opens up new opportunities for innovation. It opens up new opportunities for us to under

...

and value creation beyond what we already know.

...

And so it's not a either or it's a both in that I'm suggesting here, and I find that

...

to be really thrilling. And the other piece about diversity with an inclusion that service

...

is the work of Doctor Teresa Mob at Harvard has

...

understanding the environmental context for creativity to happen.

...

it's it's something that I highly recommend for your listeners. There's if

...

particular article that I'll point you called the confidential

...

model.

...

confidential model of creativity and innovation. And so

...

Okay.

...

Yes. And so what Doctor

...

is referencing, and I'm gonna generalize just

...

here for efficiency and simplicity is that if you think about

...

personal creativity, individual group creativity, say a group of employees.

...

Right. So if you're a group of Lgbt employees,

...

you have a different lived experience, than

...

and understanding of how the world works then

...

your straight counterparts in in a S.

...

I dare say, I dare so you have you have take a skin to begin with.

...

Absolutely. And so when you think about that,

...

that is resources skills and motivations that create those novel ideas

...

is that that novel inside at that group individual or individual group level.

...

whether or not that novel insights becomes

...

enterprise wide innovation.

...

depends upon the alignment between the motivation skills and resources

...

of the of individual or an individual group who surfaced that novelty

...

in the alignment of the organizational

...

resource allocation decisions, skill development focus, and motivations of the organization

...

if those things are alignment then that individual creativity be

...

tons speed enterprise wide innovation. If it doesn't, it sits there as latent capacity.

...

And so these are the the the goals of diverse inclusion are to unlock the

...

latent capacity because creativity manifest differently in all kinds of

...

from groups and so much of our creativity

...

up to this point has dependent on this right or this domain gatekeeper

...

to say this user is no valuable And in certain context that has

...

that there there's reason for that. I'd like, for example, in the pharmaceutical

...

checks I I would not I might think about that a little bit

...

differently. And say that's a good thing that somebody knows chemistry.

...

is making these decisions about whether something creative has value or not the pharmaceutical context.

...

but that does not hold true across all domains.

...

And so this idea of the radar really reinforces the dominant

...

cultural narratives of whoever has been historically in

...

charge of that domain. And I say, let's break those wall

...

down because there is opportunity on the other side that can benefit all of humanity.

...

And and and as value on the table.

...

Stephanie, Johnson, and Jonathan York,

...

to a listeners who have popped up stage. Welcome to Obama.

...

What have you guys got to throw into the into the pot?

...

Stephanie, please go first.

...

mhmm.

...

Oh, Jonathan. That's great kind. I was going to say you got here first.

...

i'd be happy to have you go. Ralph, thank you for another

...

yeah that they can do this for the next twenty minutes. I'm sure.

...

Well, thank you for another spectacular

...

discussion. I always look forward to your discussions and the they

...

Thank you.

...

See you and c, I actually young

...

we we do what we can.

...

Mhmm.

...

See well, I keep doing it.

...

you know, I'm actually on your

...

website right now, and I'm going to scratch

...

is supplement be because

...

I'm gonna

...

occur with the company and Dey is part of what I'm

...

looking at as part of my discipline within what I'm doing.

...

and I have a ...you ...your conversation. You just

...

had the series of comments that you just made were so important

...

And so so lines with the way that I'm thinking

...

and I am curious from your

...

perspective, if I may, because I will admit you're in multitasking

...

but my sense is

...

places what I woke up with this morning.

...

is that if we have set points of assumptions,

...

I heard you when you made the comment about if you were

...

know, if you're a white cis male versus an African

...

woman who is in the same position you're you're you're so correct.

...

I feel like we're walking around with data points.

...

and sets of understanding that are not aligned

...

with da i. In other words,

...

if we're not all walking up to the same table,

...

because we're not, I believe,

...

But we're we're saying we're gonna have the same meal, and we're gonna have the same set of assumptions walking into our

...

suggestions. I just don't believe that's true. So I think it's important that we can say it would value

...

diversity, equity, and inclusion,

...

but we all have to sort of sit at the same table of truths.

...

and even comments that we make, like, I love to your point about

...

hey, you know, innovate. It's okay to fail and all these things that we used to say that

...

do not apply appropriately.

...

in today's world.

...

So you how are you thinking about D

...

moving forward. And what do we need to do with some of these more traditional corporation

...

organizations who that ...who that may

...

they may be blind to that point.

...

working on it.

...

if By making any sense in that word solid,

...

Yeah.

...

working on it.

...

I can ......because I know we're coming up on the hour ourselves try to be really efficient.

...

One of the things that

...

that I'd look for first is where does de and I efforts sit?

...

inside of an organization. If it is sitting only in human resources,

...

then that's a problem because that is a very specific

...

goal of that department in an organization.

...

if it is not singing and innovation, if

...

i I just had a conversation the other day with a fortune one hundred company.

...

the head of their diverse supply chain programming

...

it

...

Okay.

...

we

...

they well

...

we'll come back. We'll back to us.

...

getting the diversity equity

...

an inclusion supply chain conversation into the information technology

...

part of the corporation because they don't view it as part of their work.

...

And so when you

...

think about the money that gets spent, How is it being

...

what we've done is try to put a data bridge in place

...

and through a construct of hope.

...

trust in belonging and empirical measurements around those things. We can

...

literally heat map

...

just like you air map he map air quality in the city. We can heat map.

...

the culture of an organization and how the dis disregard data

...

shows the different cohorts ranging from, you know,

...

individuals based on gender ethnicity and sexual or

...

orientation how that

...

a specific combination of those things ...the cultures is operating on that group.

...

which then

...

in turn allows us to use the research and science to open up.

...

that there is money being left on the table. So we'd lean into the science, but we allow our own lived

...

experience as a as a research team and as artists to be able to ask those

...

kind of more fundamental questions that are often not asking that context.

...

The really interesting one. I'll give you fascinating data to points some

...

summer who we did a national survey. So we

...

we put this out, and we were looking at organizational response to Covid.

...

and who was doing it well, who's doing not and white it was telling us about

...

and we ...about how trust them belong because we use those three metrics together as proxy

...

for inclusion.

...

And so when we look at the data, we mapped it out, we noticed

...

that there was this one cohost that was

...

we color code so bright red, negative deviance territory. So it high trust, i hope

...

individuals. So if you're high trust high hope and hope is not optimism,

...

optimism is just this kind of notion that the future gonna work out through no

...

no action of my own. I've just got a general gonna work out. Hope is an agency quest.

...

there measures. The future is gonna work out because I can do future goal setting

...

compile resources and use those resources for multiple pathways to the goal. So

...

hope is an agency question or work. So when we looked at that decided data set,

...

what he was showing us that they says industry wide executives,

...

see suite executives or exactly where we

...

expected them to be on their belonging scores that the Lgbt and women executives

...

belonging scores were so bad.

...

that it through the entire executive cohost into this negative deviant territory.

...

to apply that to a future of work conversation. We know a lot about cognitive

...

flexibility

...

through, for example, through linguistics because you speak three languages, you get to a point.

...

where you're not only translating meaning of one word to the next language you

...

explain would you start also associating the the cultural agencies

...

that didn't informed the meaning of the definition of that word.

...

And so when you think about code switching in the organizational context,

...

you know, as an Lgbt person, I spent a lot of years changing pronouns being very

...

select about who I talked about. I was in relationships with. I know that

...

my black colleagues have

...

mountains of stories for that range from changing names to changing

...

their hair to changing the way they speak in the organizational context

...

to be able to advance in an organization. So cognitive flexibility

...

a top future of work skill. If you are a

...

black female executive to stick with your question there.

...

in in a c suite position in a dumb that's dominated by

...

white men and in the Us context over ninety,

...

one percent of our fortune and five hundred corporations are still

...

led by

...

white straight men. The very fact that you'd rise

...

to that position as a black female. You deliver an amount of

...

cognitive the flexibility that is a competitive advantage for your organization.

...

but what our day showed is that the culture of the organization is washing

...

its own competitive advantage. Most corporations response

...

to this kind of work is to say it is the

...

individual. The motivation of the employee. That's the problem.

...

And so when you think about a lot of the positive psychology work that we

...

see out there. A lot of that work focuses on the individual as the issue than these

...

to change. What doctor and Mob talks about

...

hard work and what I have as a as someone who comes out this from a public health

...

background, a social ecological model is that

...

it is the environmental context that has to change to unlock

...

the capacity of the diverse group of stakeholders that every organization

...

to increasingly going to have in the world as we see the demographics of the Us

...

changing as we see globalization taking more of a friend in a role.

...

And so

...

looking at what is required in the future of work skills

...

and then finding ways to build a data bridge.

...

that allows for that future of work skill to be understood in a context

...

that is actionable. And for a leader, is is the

...

where stephanie where I would suggest you always start at and to always make sure

...

that this is not a motivation problem of individuals. This is an environmental problem.

...

And that is should be good news to many leaders because

...

very difficult to change in individual's motivation. They have great sway

...

over the paradigms they set up and how the operational context of the work

...

happens on a day to day basis. And so this in that sense, it is within their control

...

be good news to them because it's something they can act on in a way that's gone deliver short term and

...

term results.

...

So just

...

thank you, Feel Ralph. I appreciate it. I know you're over overtime to feel that was a spectacular summary. I genuinely

...

they really appreciate that answer.

...

just hit us to did that on on on three breaths.

...

Can you believe it?

...

Amazing. It was amazing. Thank you so much. I really appreciate

...

it Ralph, Thank you for having

...

Not at all always a pleasure.

...

Jonathan, what have you got to to throw into the pot?

...

We are having some technical issues today people. This is

...

This is not a lot of fun.

...

But but high technology, techno,

...

technology is a is a is it is a tricky beast?

...

We've got my favorite Canadian in in the audience.

...

Erica, you're sitting there very very quiet. Would you like

...

throw something into the pot or are we going

...

to wait to hear from you on Monday on the on the the creative farm.

...

She's quite happily listening.

...

by the by the hand of things. Very well, listen. It is past the hour

...

and

...

say I am very, very grateful too to

...

They are dear admins and and, of course, there's

...

Stephanie.

...

and Jonathan, I am also grateful to you My ...where we hope that we can

...

reconnect once the technical issues have been sorted.

...

next time.

...

on the on the next Global studio,

...

we do this on on the Fridays, well, most fridays

...

And on Monday, I will we'll catch up

...

with a number of you, i'm sure

...

the creative farm. Thanks again, to see out

...

and to legal, and we will

...

ceo you or rather hear you.

...

at the next global studio where we talk about

...

things that are generally of importance

...

to the business world out that, even if the business world

...

doesn't necessarily know it.

...

Just yet, have a great afternoon, everyone.

Fortune Cookie